dynamicafrica:

"Anita: Speaking Truth to Power."

Recently watched this powerful and compelling documentary about Anita Hill and the sexual assault case where she provided testimony against Judge Clarence Thomas who was then nominated for the US Supreme Court.

At the time Hill, who was a former employee of Thomas’ (who shamefully called the proceedings a case of ‘high-tech lynching’ as a way to deflect from the issue of sexual harassment by using race as a factor - the only factor), was a law professor at the University of Oklahoma where she grew up. She gave her testimony live on national television in October 1991 and, unbeknownst to her, the effect of her decision to speak out would almost immediately spark what the Boston Globe called, “a passionate debate about sexual harassment in the workplace and elsewhere”, and one that is far from over.

In a world where gender and racial oppression are systemic, and where victims are blamed and perpetrators shielded by the oppressive and shaming nature of rape culture, Anita Hill’s story remains both relevant and necessary in its telling. What’s I found particularly interesting about the film is how director Freida Mock conveyed this story in such a way that made it both Anita’s story and that of so many women in the United States and around the world.

Hill, now a professor and Brandeis University, has dedicated much of her life to speaking about sexual harassment and gender issues, as well as how these matters often intersect with race, as well as helping others find their voice. 

Justice Thomas is a known creep.

Also, it warms my heart that “uncle tom” is the third Google search term that comes up when you start your prospective search with “justice thomas”.

(via willowtreefree)

covenesque:

chescaleigh:

lizislazy:

If you automatically give the benefit of the doubt even to potential racists but not to potential and actual victims of racism, you are racist. If your first instinct is to invent a scenario in which something racist is okay rather than to support and listen to…

Unfortunately, many people think like this. Seriously, I have even seen people try to argue that the reverse redlining conducted by the hand of Wells Fargo was not evidence of systemic discrimination because black churches were also involved. In almost any case involving excessive police force against black people (or just people in general), you’ll see a plurality of internet comments in support of the police, regardless of how cut and dry the latent racism may seem to folks like you and me. It’s a toxic combination of right-wing authoritarianism, Just World theorizing, and, in many cases, plain old privilege. 

gellijelli:

NO THANK YOU HUMAN.

how I feel about online dating

gellijelli:

NO THANK YOU HUMAN.

how I feel about online dating

(via youngblackandvegan)

Remember Renisha McBride and That Imperfect Black Women’s Lives Also Matter

gradientlair:

On November 2, 2013, Ted Wafer, a 55 year old White male resident of Dearborn Heights, Michigan, killed Renisha McBride, a 19 year old young Black woman who was injured from a car accident and seeking assistance. According to Detroit Free Press, Ted Wafer has been charged with second degree murder and manslaughter, where if convicted he can face up to life in prison. However, they’re already bringing out the “Angry Black Woman” trope and tapping into anti-Black myths about inherent violent behavior and criminality for Black people as a way to smear her name. I expect her name will be dragged through the mud and she, not Wafer will really be on trial in the way that Trayvon Martin, not George Zimmerman was.

Though she’s a Black woman and not a Black man (and let’s not be obtuse; we know despite some extrajudicial/White male killings being of Black women, Black women receive less media coverage and community support, and virtually none if they are Black trans women…so don’t even) and because she had been drinking, not sober, let’s not forget that Black women who are sober (i.e. Rekia Boyd), Black men who are intoxicated (i.e. Rodney King) and Black men who are legally sober (i.e. Oscar Grant) are still harmed or murdered, period.

image

Thus, the urge for misogynoir (anti-Black misogyny that deems Black women’s lives less valuable than Black men’s), for patriarchal cisheterosexism (idea that cishet Black men’s lives are more valuable than other Black people’s lives and that Black women have “easier” lives than Black men) and the politics of respectability (idea that she’s not an “acceptable” and “appropriate” victim to support)—that’s making some of us Black folks not be concerned for McBride’s family or the fact that she was shot in the face despite being unarmed and needing medical attention—is an urge that needs to be deconstructed and rejected.

Of course White supremacy dictates that Whites have every racist, classist, misogynoiristic response to her death and will act as if she is on trial, not Wafer, and of course haul out their ahistorical and ignorant tropes about “Black on Black crime" and the filthy lie about how Black people “don’t care” as a distraction, but I don’t write to them or for them. Instead, I’m thinking about how some of us Black folks have bailed on Renisha and how we can change this in general for Black women (though especially for Black trans women).

Remember Renisha McBride and that despite being cis (let’s always complicate cis privilege discussion for Black women; the complication is not denial of privilege; it is nuance and it is intersectionality), she, like many Black women are viewed as “equally violent” as Black men, face the same violence that Black men often do (i.e. Marlene Pinnock, Dr. Ersula Ore) and cannot reasonably expect any protection from the State whatsoever, whether in a historic context or even now when we are viewed as not capable of being harmed or needing help (i.e. via misogynoiristic and ableist archetypes such as “Strong Black Woman” and “Angry Black Woman” who are “automatically violent”) but only as capable of harming others. The fear of Blackness is always deemed reasonable and a death sentence in response is regularly deemed justifiable.

Coverage/Press:

  • As far as I know, there is no live visual coverage of the jury selection (which started today) or the trial itself, which also speaks to lower visibility for Black women as victims.
  • @FeministaJones started the hashtag #RememberRenisha since people tend to do things with tags like “RenishaTrial” which connects to what I just stated about Black victims being on trial for their own deaths.
  • @dreamhampton mentioned to follow @ColorofChange for updates on Ted Wafer’s trial.  
  • @oralandar_DN and @idabeewells have live tweets on the jury selection and trial.
  • My posts on this are tagged on my blog via her name “Renisha McBride.”

While I wish she would have had more support and someone to take her home that evening, I don’t think a bullet in the head is an adequate response. But again, plenty of Black people have been murdered similarly and were sober. Blackness is always deemed sufficient proof to justify death. Anything else is tacked on as extra. 

While I have less than zero percent faith in both her memory and her family getting the support they need and Ted Wafer actually paying for deciding to murder her—in such a way, placed a cool as a cucumber call to 911 after murdering her and being arrested weeks later—I still hope that the calloused crime will evoke some sense of accountability and that her life won’t be yet another Black life deemed worthless and disposable; somehow.

Related Posts: White Supremacy Still Matters More To Whites Than Renisha McBride’s LifeUnlike Renisha McBride, A White Woman Came To My Door (Not Even For Help) And Lived Another Day, tweets re: dealing with intoxicated Whites, but I didn’t use murder as the solution [X]

reblogged without comment

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

yungprofesora:

maghrabiyya:

cosbyykidd:

yokhakidfiasco:

flawlessxqueen:

ourafrica:

I’m so upset, angry and just completely disgusted about this story!


Matthew Durham, 19, allegedly confessed to sexually assaulting several children at an orphanage in Kenya, police said. (Credit: KFOR)

An Edmond teenager faces a possible life in prison sentence after authorities say they learned about shocking crimes he allegedly committed on an African mission trip.

The suspect was volunteering at a Kenyan children’s home when he allegedly raped and molested a number of young children.

According to court records, 19-year-old Matthew Durham confessed to raping several young girls, forcing some boys to perform oral sex on him and even making other kids watch.

“This is a young man in our community that made choices to exploit children in an orphanage,” said United States Attorney Sanford Coats. “It’s a true tragedy all the way around.”

The 19-year-old suspect traveled overseas with a group called Upendo.

Upendo is an organization that assists neglected Kenyan kids by providing food, housing, clothes and religion.

While Durham volunteered to travel overseas several times over the last two years, on his last visit, the criminal complaint alleges, “Durham requested to stay at the children’s home in an ‘overflow bunk’ rather than at an offsite facility.”

During that visit, several alleged victims claimed Durham “often touched them in a sexual manner or told them to touch themselves while he watched.”

Once confronted, Durham allegedly came clean.

“A caretaker at the orphanage noticed something wasn’t right and confronted Mr. Durham. He admitted to some of the acts,” said Coats.

The affidavit continues, “The victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive.”

Prosecutors say while the alleged sex crimes were committed overseas, Durham can be held accountable for the crimes in Oklahoma.

Durham is being held without bond.

This sick fuck. These people are fucking gross.

What. The. Fuck. 

what the fuck yo

i’m fucking furious

I swear to God, these are the worst kinds of people. Dear Lord, please get these white missionaries out of Africa.

The victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive. The victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive. The victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive. The victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive.

Also, the victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive. The victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive.

rtamerica:

Revealed: More than 1,000 complaints of NYPD chokeholds in recent years
There have been over 1,000 complaints of New York City police misconduct in recent years regarding officers’ use of chokeholds, a city agency that is investigating the incidents said days after a man put into hold by police died in Staten Island.
The Civilian Complaint Review Board has received charges of about 1,022 instances since 2009 in which New York Police Department (NYPD) officers were accused of using chokeholds. Use of such holds are prohibited by the NYPD’s patrol guidelines, which outline a chokehold as a “any pressure to the throat or windpipe, which may prevent or hinder breathing or reduce intake of air.”

that moment when you realize that the exception swallows the rule

rtamerica:

Revealed: More than 1,000 complaints of NYPD chokeholds in recent years

There have been over 1,000 complaints of New York City police misconduct in recent years regarding officers’ use of chokeholds, a city agency that is investigating the incidents said days after a man put into hold by police died in Staten Island.

The Civilian Complaint Review Board has received charges of about 1,022 instances since 2009 in which New York Police Department (NYPD) officers were accused of using chokeholds. Use of such holds are prohibited by the NYPD’s patrol guidelines, which outline a chokehold as a “any pressure to the throat or windpipe, which may prevent or hinder breathing or reduce intake of air.”

that moment when you realize that the exception swallows the rule

(via covenesque)

asker

Anonymous asked: Petition to end memes of black girls making "strange" faces, especially without their permission.

seriously tho

withyourhalstondress:

bthny:

"Im going to go out on a limb and say, I think that you’d be well served with a change of pace. Lets say a large black guy. Not the steal you purse and lunch money kind but the Crocheting kind. Give it some thought. I’ll be around, for how long, I can not say. lol"

image

This dude is racist against his fucking SELF.

RIGHT?! Why do assimilation fetishists do this?

#stopinsecureblackmen2014